Link Roundup!: Popcorn Secrets; Theme Weddings; Return of the King (Bloomberg)

+ All you need to make air-popped popcorn: a microwave; some kernels; a brown paper bag. Cheap and delicious.

+ Theme weddings! Pro or con? The wedding my little family went to this past wedding was at a camp, and the theme of all camp weddings is “let’s pretend we’re kids again, or at least young 20-somethings, and don’t mind cold outdoor showers.” Other themes are more elaborate and, potentially, controversial. But how could anyone argue against Mexican “Star Trek”?

Up until two years ago, I, myself, had never had the privilege of attending any wedding with a theme other than “whoops, she’s pregnant” or “might as well.” Besides going to a lot of weddings, I’ve also been married twice. My first wedding was to a nice dude I met at 21 and married at 22. The wedding was themed “let’s get married.” In August of 2012, I planned on marrying for the second time. This time around I was 30 years old and marrying my partner of the previous five years. After the proposal, it took us maybe 20 minutes to decide on what sort of party to plan. We agreed upon the one thing that always brought us together as a couple, gave us great joy and happiness through the years, and defined us both as human beings. No, it wasn’t a Bruno Mars song or a certain kind of flower. It was Star Trek. We both love THE FUCK out of Star Trek. And since I am from a Mexican family and there is no way I could get married without the inclusion of mariachi music and Mexican food, we decided to have a Mexican Star Trek wedding and call the theme “Trek Mex.” …

Star Trek-themed attire was suggested, but absolutely not required. The only rules were have a good time and if you are white and choose to come as a Klingon DO NOT DO SO IN BLACK FACE. More people than expected showed up in all sorts of costumes. My dad wore a Worf mask that he refused to take off for all of our family photos.

+ Michael Bloomberg is back in at Bloomberg LP. Yay?

When he left politics, Mr. Bloomberg, 72, was expected to devote most of his time to giving away his $32.8 billion fortune. Those philanthropic efforts — on issues like gun control, immigration and public health — were supposed to take up much of his time and he would “most likely spend a few hours a day working from his new desk on the fifth floor,” at Bloomberg’s offices, according to a memo Mr. Doctoroff sent employees in January.

But in recent months, Mr. Bloomberg — who still owns 88 percent of the company — has become an increasing presence at Bloomberg’s Lexington Avenue headquarters. Those “few hours” soon turned into six and seven hours a day with Mr. Bloomberg taking a hands-on role in meetings and strategy decisions. Mr. Doctoroff, 56, a former deputy mayor of New York and private equity executive, told Mr. Bloomberg about two weeks ago that he planned to resign, frustrated with how the leadership dynamic had shifted. Mr. Bloomberg urged him to stay and remain chief executive, but Mr. Doctoroff demurred.

Aw, poor Doctoroff. It’s hard to be the Medvedev to anyone’s Putin.

This is the most amazing part of the article:

Whatever fissures existed below the surface between the two men, both insisted that there was no fight over leadership. “The press always wants to write about a battle,” Mr. Bloomberg said. “There was not a battle.”

With a wry smile and a laugh, Mr. Doctoroff said: “Mike is kind of like God at the company. He created the universe. He issued the Ten Commandments and then he disappeared. And then he came back. You have to understand that when God comes back, things are going to be different. When God reappeared, people defer.”

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